WElkins Medical

WElkins EMT/ICU Temperature Management System

Temperature management is an essential component in modern healthcare, affecting a plethora of physiological factors from metabolic activity to glucose level. In use for centuries, patient temperature management is widely recognized as a key contributor to the maintenance of normal physiology and impact on recovery after an illness.

WElkins’ EMT/ICU Temperature Management System provides hospitals and emergency care givers a means of controlling patient temperature in a safe, non-invasive, and effective way across the continuum of care—from the critical minutes after an injury thru to the ICU and recovery.

Components

Ultra-early delivery of therapeutic cooling in the field—because time is brain, and every second counts.
  • Lightweight, portable, rugged
  • For EMTs/combat medics
  • Ideal for pre-hospital cooling
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Fast, simple, and reliable cooling therapy with microprocessor-driven automatic temperature control.
  • Intuitive touchscreen interface
  • Automatic temperature control
  • Ideal for in-hospital cooling
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Innovative, non-invasive cooling pad for use with both EMT and ICU Systems.
  • Patented micro-dot design
  • Integrated cervical collar
  • Pneumatic counter pressure
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End-to-End Care

WElkins’ EMT/ICU Temperature Management System provides hospitals and emergency care givers a means of controlling patient temperature in a safe, non-invasive, and effective way across the continuum of care—from the critical minutes after an injury thru to the ICU and recovery:

  • The Cooling Headliner integrates with a universal, adjustable cervical collar for streamlined deployment (stabilization of the head and neck is typically one of the first steps in emergency medical response), and features quick-release connectors that enable rapid patient transfer from EMT to ICU without removing the pad. Stabilization of the head-neck and deployment of cooling is now possible in under 60 seconds.
  • The EMT System is lightweight, portable and self-contained, ideal for ultra-early cooling in the field and during transit to the hospital.
  • The ICU System is microprocessor controlled for longer-term, automated patient temperature management in the hospital and during recovery.

Why Cooling?

Temperature is one of the human body’s main vital signs, and temperature management has long been recognized as vital to life. Many patients who have return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest eventually have a poor neurological outcome due to hypoxic-ischemic brain injuryHypoxic-Ischemic Injury (HII): a significant cause of mortality and severe neurologic disability, HII is a diagnostic term that encompasses a complex constellation of injuries to the brain—ranging from cardiac and respiratory arrest to carbon monoxide and other poisonous gas exposure—that involve injurious reductions of oxygen (i.e. hypoxia) and/or diminished blood supply (ischemia) to the brain. (1). Induced mild hypothermia appears to limit tissue damage by reducing oxygen metabolism and inflammation, while maintaining cell membrane integrity (2). For heart attack survivors, hypothermia after cardiac arrest (HACA) is a cost-effective way to improve long-term quality of life (3).

Today, major medical societies recommend temperature management as the standard of care therapy for many critically ill or surgical patients:

1.
American Heart Association Guidelines 2010

American Heart Association Guidelines 2010

Post-cardiac arrest care has received a great deal of focus in the AHA Guidelines 2010 and is probably the most important new area of emphasis. Included in the Guidelines are the following recommendations:

“Induced hypothermia, although best studied in survivors of ventricular fibrillation/pulseless ventricular tachycardia arrest, is generally recommended for adult survivors of cardiac arrest who remain unconscious, regardless of presenting rhythm. Hypothermia should be initiated as soon as possible after return of spontaneous circulation with a target temperature of 32°C-34°C.”

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2.
The Hypothermia After Cardiac Arrest Study Group

The Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest Study Group

In this multicenter trial with blinded assessment of the outcome, patients who had been resuscitated after cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation were randomly assigned to undergo therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 32°C to 34°C, measured in the bladder) over a period of 24 hours or to receive standard treatment with normothermia. The results show that therapeutic mild hypothermia:

  • Increases chances of survival by 31%
  • Improves quality of survival by 41%
  • Protects tissue during ischemia by reducing oxygen metabolism and inflammation, while maintaining cell membrane integrity
  • (In the case of reperfusion injury) Reduces neuronal cell damage, free radical production and inflammatory responses, which are destructive to cells that have had blood flow restored after a period of ischemia

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3.
American Heart Association Circulation 2009

American Heart Association Circulation 2009

The AHA developed a decision module to capture costs and outcomes for patients with witnessed out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation arrest who received conventional care or therapeutic hypothermia. In cardiac arrest survivors who met HACA trial criteria, therapeutic hypothermia with a cooling blanket was found to improve clinical outcomes with cost-effectiveness that is comparable to many economically acceptable health care interventions in the United States:

  • On average, postarrest patients receiving therapeutic hypothermia gained an average of 0.66 quality-adjusted life years compared with conventional care, at an incremental cost of $31,254
  • Even at extreme estimates for costs, the cost-effectiveness of hypothermia remained less than the standard benchmark $100,000 per quality-adjusted life year

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Further Reading